Tag Archives: Matthew 25:14-30

An Introduction to Stewardship

9 May

Last week in “Our Effort or God’s Gift” we explored the idea that our income is not the result of our hard work or superior education. Rather, our paychecks are a gift from God. And they are a gift which we are expected to handle wisely. Indeed, Jesus declared that, “From everyone who has been given much, much will be required; and to whom they entrusted much, of him they will ask all the more.” (Luke 12:48) This week, we’ll be exploring this concept of stewardship with a bit more depth, beginning with the parable of the talents.

In Matthew 25:14-30, Jesus tells His disciples a story about a wealthy businessman who, before leaving on a long journey, decided to commit portions of his fortune to his servants. To one, he gave five talents of gold, to another two, and to another one. It is interesting that Jesus doesn’t distinguish between the servants. He doesn’t tell us what roles they held within the household or how hard they labored on their master’s behalf. In fact, the only distinction between them is the amount of money that the master left in their care.

Upon his return, the master found that the first servant doubled the value of his investment. The second servant, likewise, made a return on the rich man’s money. The third, however, took the path of extreme caution. Opting for a “low-risk investment”, he buried the gold and returned it to his master exactly what had been given. (Though, perhaps, a bit dustier than it had been initially.)

Jesus goes on to explain the master’s pleasure with both men who, despite the disparity in what he had given them, gave him a good return on his investment. The third man, however, didn’t fare quite so well. He had done as little as possible with the resources entrusted to his care and reaped the “reward” due a lazy steward.

The passage ends on a theme quite similar to that of Luke 12:48: “For to everyone who has, more shall be given, and he will have an abundance; but from the one who does not have, even what he does have shall be taken away.” (Matthew 25:29) The moral? God’s gift to us doesn’t just consist of a paycheck, but of His trust that we will handle that paycheck well.[1]

Indeed, with money, just as with everything else, we are merely stewards – those who handle wealth on behalf of another. And God is clear that, “As each one has received a special gift, employ it in serving one another as good stewards of the manifold grace of God.” (1 Peter 4:10)

Next week, we’ll dig a bit deeper into the concept of stewardship. Meanwhile, feel free to share your own thoughts and ideas in the comment box below!


[1] We have chosen to focus on the monetary aspect of this passage, but it is important to note that the concept of stewardship extends to every area of our lives: our time, our skills, and our physical resources.

Advertisements

The Rummage Sale

22 May

Read: Matthew 25:14-30

“Every good thing given and every perfect gift is from above, coming down from the Father of lights, with whom there is no variation or shifting shadow.”

James 1:17 NASB

A quick look around the nursery was sufficient to see that we had too much plant material on hand.  The season was nearing an end and, without enough room to plant the remaining trees and shrubs on our own lot or to successfully over winter them in the greenhouse, we had no choice but to begin marking down the product.

We placed each discounted plant in an area of the nursery marked with red tape, their new prices or the percentage discount prominently displayed on each one.  Many of the plants saw discounts far beyond half off (you’ve heard that saying: “If it ain’t half off, it ain’t on sale”).  It was not ideal, but we felt that we had little choice… and our customers did enjoy the newfound treasures!

I saw plenty of these healthy, but dilapidated-looking pieces of greenery come through the check stands with their $40 price tags crossed out and $5 scrawled in its place.  Anyone who knew what the nursery had originally paid for these plants would have been impressed by such discounts… but even this was insufficient to please a few rare customers.

I was working this “rummage sale” area one afternoon when a lady approached me.  “I want to speak to a manager about getting a discount on these.  They look a bit ragged.”

I quickly explained that it was for this very reason that they had already been marked down, but to no avail.  After failing to reach the manager about the possibility of an even deeper discount, I suggested that we speak with the assistant manager.

“I already talked to her,” my customer replied.  “She said no, so I want to talk with the manager.”

Sadly, when this could not be arranged, she left the store… without the plant in question.  It was an amazing price, but apparently, not amazing enough.

Unfortunately, oft times we as Christians behave in a similar manner.  Seeing the good gifts that God has already given us, the great deal offered at His expense, we seek even more.  While there is nothing wrong with doing so, we must keep in mind that what God has already offered is of phenomenal quality… even when it doesn’t come in the type of packages we expect!

To reject His gifts on the grounds that they aren’t exactly what we would have chosen for ourselves is foolish.  Instead, we must seek to take advantage of all that He offers us… and turn it again to His service!

Challenge:  Don’t let what you wish you had keep you from accepting God’s best for you.  Remember that all good things are a demonstration of His love and can be used in His service… even if they aren’t exactly what we’d hoped for!

Potable Drinking Water

6 Mar

Read: Matthew 25:14-30

“And the one also who had received the one talent came up and said, ‘Master, I knew you to be a hard man, reaping where you did not sow and gathering where you scattered no seed.  And I was afraid, and went away and hid your talent in the ground.  See, you have what is yours.’  But his master answered and said to him, ‘You wicked, lazy slave… you ought to have put my money in the bank, and on my arrival I would have received my money back with interest.” – Matthew 25:24-26a, 27b NASB

 

I loathe the misuse of the English language.  I’m not talking about the ordinary misuse which takes place during every day dialogue (that’s to be expected), but the type of misuse which takes place in professional media.

For example, you would think that when someone was advertising a product, they would take the time to make certain that the name of the product was spelled correctly.   Management (at least, most management) should be wise enough to recognize that allowing simple errors in spelling to be posted on a billboard reflects poorly on the establishment.

Likewise, I have a beef with those who try to give their outfit a high class appearance by using words which are redundant, exceed the limits of the average vocabulary, or both.  With this in mind, I was less than pleased when I walked into the pet department one afternoon and saw a sign above our rain barrels reading: Safe for Potable Drinking Water.  Since “potable” means “drinkable”, the sign might as well have read: Safe for Drinkable Drinking Water.  I explained this to management and even went through the effort of proving it with my trusty dictionary, but to no avail.  Despite knowing that their word usage was incorrect, management had no intention of changing the sign.  Every time I walked past, I couldn’t help thinking about how foolish we looked!

Unfortunately, many times we as Christians behave quite similarly.  God’s Word is available to us and we know that what we are doing isn’t right.  But it would require effort on our part to correct our behavior, so we just leave it hanging there: an obvious testimony to our own foolishness.

Perhaps this is why Jesus spent so much time emphasizing the need to do our best with everything God has placed in our charge – no matter how little it may seem.  Only when we truly seek to honor God by giving Him the best we have can we expect to reap a reward!

Challenge: Are you doing your best with what God has given you or are you letting the little things slide?  This week, commit to taking the time to do your best with every task set before you.  You can be assured that God will be pleased with your efforts!

%d bloggers like this: