Tag Archives: Gluttony

Evangelism and Physical Fitness: Avoiding the Sin of Gluttony Part III

27 Dec

Last week in “Avoiding the Sin of Gluttony Part II”, we discussed the importance of recognizing that gluttony isn’t just about how much we eat, but also about what we eat. We explored why moderation (not eating more than you need) is important not just as it pertains to our caloric intake, but also as it pertains to where we get those calories. This week, we’ll be reflecting on the more philosophical side as we discuss the role that the heart plays in the sin of gluttony – and why our thoughts about our food matter as much as the food, itself.

If you’re anything like me, you probably really enjoy a good buffet. With generous portions of everything from salads and desserts to ethnic delicacies, the options tantalize our taste buds. As a kid, I’d eagerly load up my plate with just a little bit of everything – often far more than I could actually eat. My eyes were, as my mother put it, “bigger than my stomach.” It is here, in the buffet line as we wait for our shot at the BBQ chicken wings and pasta salad, that we encounter the crux of gluttony: greed.

In Luke 12:15-21, Jesus tells His followers to, “Beware, and be on your guard against every form of greed; for not even when one has an abundance does his life consist of his possessions. And He told them a parable, saying, “The land of a rich man was very productive. And he began reasoning to himself, saying, ‘What shall I do, since I have no place to store my crops?’ Then he said, ‘This is what I will do: I will tear down my barns and build larger ones, and there I will store all my grain and my goods. And I will say to my soul, “Soul, you have many goods laid up for many years to come; take your ease, eat, drink and be merry.” ’ But God said to him, ‘You fool! This very night your soul is required of you; and now who will own what you have prepared?’ So is the man who stores up treasure for himself, and is not rich toward God.”

Jesus goes on to explain that greed isn’t just about our wanting more. In fact, ultimately, it isn’t about our wanting “cool stuff” or seeking our neighbors’ approval or fitting in at all. Greed is about our failure to trust God to provide us with the sense of satisfaction and fulfillment that we seek through owning (or eating) too much. (Luke 12:22-34) The things we value (or overvalue), show the world Who or what owns our heart. And while we may tend to think of treasure in the sense of material goods like money, fashionable clothing, or fast cars, those aren’t the only things which can capture our minds and control our actions.

In Colossians 3:5, the Apostle Paul warns believers to, “consider the members of your earthly body as dead to immorality, impurity, passion, evil desire, and greed, which amounts to idolatry.” Indeed, we are to view Christ as our all-in-all (v.11). When we do, we avoid the sin of gluttony and show honor to the One who gave us food both for our sustenance and our enjoyment!

Evangelism and Physical Fitness: Avoiding the Sin of Gluttony Part II

20 Dec

Last week in “Avoiding the Sin of Gluttony”, we discussed importance of moderation in what we eat. We explored the value of monitoring our caloric intake to ensure that our bodies are actually using what we put into them. We also considered how that intake varies for different people at different times in their lives. But is balancing your calories enough to help you steer clear of the sin of gluttony?

If you played along and tracked what you ate this last week, you probably noticed a few patterns in the what, when, and how much you eat. You may have noticed that you have a weakness for doughnuts, coffee, or a really good steak. Perhaps you even noticed that you do demonstrate moderation in what you eat and don’t eat more (in a caloric sense) than you actually need to maintain a healthy body.

If, however, you were tracking the nutritional value of what you ate and not just the calorie count, you likely noticed that there is far more involved in a balanced diet than simply subtracting the calories you expend from the calories you take in. If you’re a bit like me, you eat more sugar than is strictly healthy (at least according to the current views of the American Heart Association) and could use just a bit more protein and fiber.

And this leads us to our second point about gluttony: the concept of moderation applies not just to the overall energy we take in, but also to the way we take in that energy. Does this mean that if we don’t want to be gluttons, we need to avoid doughnuts? Hardly! It doesn’t even mean that we can’t splurge a bit and have two. What it does mean is that we need to ensure that our bodies aren’t getting too much of one thing and too little of others. If maintaining a healthy weight means that we can only take in so many calories each day, but we take in most of those in the forms of sugars or carbs, we end up short-changing ourselves on other things like protein and fiber. Balance and moderation, therefore, require us to pay attention to not just how much we eat, but to what we eat.

Gluttony, however, isn’t just about how much we eat or even what we eat – it’s also about why we eat. Like most sins, dishonoring our bodies through excessive eating or eating the wrong types of things begins not with the head, but with the heart. Next week, we’ll take a look at the role that our thoughts about food play in whether we do or don’t become gluttons. Meanwhile, feel free to share your thoughts on the subject in the comment box below!

 

Evangelism and Physical Fitness: Avoiding the Sin of Gluttony Part I

13 Dec

While the Bible doesn’t share many universal dietary commands, there are two which do deserve our notice. Proverbs 23:20,21 advises, “Do not be with heavy drinkers of wine, Or with gluttonous eaters of meat; For the heavy drinker and the glutton will come to poverty, And drowsiness will clothe one with rags.” Proverbs 24:7 goes on to emphasize that, “He who keeps the law is a discerning son, but he who is a companion of gluttons humiliates his father.” The advice? Just because a little is good doesn’t mean that a lot is better. Anything we do (including eating and drinking) can cause damage if it isn’t done in moderation.

So what exactly is moderation? Simply put, it’s not taking more than you need. This doesn’t mean that we don’t enjoy what we eat or drink (the professional chefs amongst us need not worry), but it does mean that we aren’t stuffing our bodies full of calories that we aren’t going to burn.

At the same time, it doesn’t mean that we starve ourselves either. While there are some aesthetics who believe that a constant sense of hunger can be used to remind us of those who live without enough, this belief goes well beyond the concept of moderation that we find presented in Scripture.

Instead, one might argue that moderation is about balance: ensuring that the calories we take in are roughly equal to the calories we expend. If this is the case, “moderation” is going to look different for everyone and, in fact, it may even look different for the same person at different times. While dieticians warn about varying an individual’s calorie intake too dramatically over a short period of time, it’s reasonable to presume that I’m going to need a bit more energy to hike Mt. Everest than is required for a lazy day curled up with a good book. Keeping this in mind can help make a difference between maintaining a healthy body that allows me to actively engage others with the Good News of God’s Love or finding myself steeped in a constant battle with preventable[1] disabilities.

So how do I know whether I’m eating moderately? One of the best ways to start is to keep a food journal like the one provided through http://www.myfitnesspal.com/. I like this particular program, since it helps you track more than just what you eat, but also what’s in what you eat from sugars and fats to protein and calcium. It also allows you to set the program based upon your general activity level and log any exercise efforts outside of the norm, so you’ll get a rough picture of whether your weekly caloric input matches or exceeds your body’s needs. Log everything you eat from the time you get up until the time you go to bed, but don’t try to make any changes just yet. The goal here is to observe.

By the time you reach the end of the week, you’ll likely have picked up on some patterns healthy or otherwise. We’ll share some good advice for addressing those patterns in a Biblical fashion next week. Meanwhile, feel free to share your thoughts in the comment box below!


[1] It’s important to recognize that the key word here is “preventable”. While Christians ought to do what they can to maintain the gift God has given them in the form of their physical health, not all efforts to do so will find success. Genetics, hormone production, and other factors often play a role in our ability to prevent disease and burn fat. The question being addressed here is not one of how much an individual Christian weighs, but of whether they are living a life obedient to God’s command for moderation.

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