Tag Archives: Drawing the Line Between Work and Rest

Evangelism and Physical Fitness: Fitting Rest Into Your Schedule

11 Oct

From keeping our minds sharp and at the top of their game to helping us to maintain a positive and gracious attitude towards others, there can be no doubt that rest plays a vital role in our ability to clearly and effectively present the message of Christ.  Yet finding time to relax, enjoy a sunset, or take a nap isn’t always easy.  That’s why, this week, we’re taking a look at some ways to effectively fit time for rest into our schedules.  We’ll start with the most important suggestion:

  1. Actually schedule time for rest.  “To do’s” get lost.  Appointments don’t.  If you block out a few minutes on your calendar, you’re far more likely to fulfill the goal of resting than if you simply add “rest” to the interminably long list of things you need to accomplish each day.  Select the times which work best for you and follow through.
  2. Let others know about your schedule.  While issuing an “informational bulletin” doesn’t guarantee that you’ll be left alone, it does lessen the chances of your being interrupted once you’ve settled in with a cup of coffee and a good book.
  3. Find a place to hide.  While we don’t recommend becoming a hermit, it can be worth your while to find a place to retreat for your “resting appointments”.  By minimizing your availability to others and changing the scenery a bit, you’ll be maximizing the chances that your time of rest will be… well, restful.
  4. Plan your rest.  Blocking out an hour to listen to Rachmaninoff, go for a meandering walk, or watch the birds at your feeder can add the kind of structure that makes that “scheduled rest” feel more like a “must-keep appointment”.  The result?  You’re more likely to keep your commitment.
  5. Don’t plan what to do during your rest.  While planning rest works for some folks, it doesn’t work for everyone.  Sometimes a glorious hour of “nothing” is more effective than a well thought out plan.  Do whatever works best for you – even if it’s a bit of both!
  6. Determine when to quit.  There’s no end to our revolving “to do” lists, so it isn’t a surprise that they appear at both the beginning and the end of our “resting” advice.  Quite frankly, we can run ourselves ragged trying to keep up with all of the tasks which need to be accomplished.  Determine a time each evening when you’re going to call it quits then stick to it.  Put the “to do” list away, change into your jammies, and just relax.  You’ll find yourself sleeping better and waking fresher as you reap the full benefits of rest.

These, of course, are only a few ideas to help you make rest a regular part of your life and it may take time to fully implement them.  Schedules change as do the demands presented by family, church, school, and work.  The blocks of time available for rest this week may not be the same next week.  That’s okay.  The idea is to make resting a priority in our lives.

Next week, we’ll be concluding our series with a look at how hobbies help or hinder our attempts to relax.  Meanwhile, feel free to share your own tips for scheduling rest in the comment box below!

 

Evangelism and Physical Fitness: Setting Boundaries Between Rest and Ministry Part I

20 Sep

Rushing home from work, I crammed my dinner down my throat.  Taking a quick glance at the clock, I hopped in for a three minute shower, then out of the tub, back into my clothes, out the door, and to the church.  A long day at the office resulted in my leaving late and everything between that and the time I walked through the doors of the sanctuary was just a blur.  I was exhausted, but the night was still young.  Inside were kids (lots of them) waiting for my attention.  “Did I even eat dinner?” I asked myself, truly wondering whether I had as I plopped my Bible on the music stand.

We’ve all been there.  School and work can be tiring and sometimes overly so.  We look forward to our time off, but before we reach that blessed relief, we find another demand or two knocking on our door.  Unlike the demand for an education or the money to pay our bills, these demands are more persistent: they come from the church.  Often wrapped in the sentiments of “will you please pray about God’s call regarding your service” or “could you do this just once… no one else will”, it can be hard to see these demands as “optional”.  After all, if we love God, we should be about His work.  Right?

While it’s true that those who belong to God will serve Him (John 12:26), we are severely mistaken if we believe that the only way to do so is through the doors of the church.  After all, Jesus’ commission to us was to “Go into the world…” (Matthew 28:18), not to ask it to come to us!  The result is that, while service within the church is important, a good deal of our work as believers ought to take place outside it… in the halls of academia, in supermarket aisles, and even in the company break room.  It is in these places that our ability to shine the light of Christ matters most because here, the darkness is greatest.

This doesn’t, of course, mean that we ought never to serve in our local body of believers.  Scripture is pretty clear about the importance of service within the body of Christ.  (Galatians 5:13, 1 Peter 4:10)  What it does mean is that we ought never to serve simply because we (or others) feel that service is somehow more “godly” if it is done from a pulpit or the front of a classroom.  There are plenty of ways to be a useful member of the body of Christ and each of them is important to the health of the whole!  (Romans 12:6-8, 1 Corinthians 7:7 and 12:4-31)

How does this relate to rest?  Quite honestly, it means that whenever we are given an opportunity to serve, we need to prayerfully consider the whole equation.  Has God gifted you for a particular task?  If He has, doesn’t always mean that He’s calling you to exercise that gift right now.  Take the time to consider whether you have the resources in both time and energy to do the job well.  If not, there’s a good chance this isn’t the right time for you to commit to being the church organist or teaching a preschool class.

While some would argue that those whom God calls, God equips, there are others who equally rightly point out that there is a time and a season for everything (Ecclesiastes 3:1-8).  Take some time to pray about the opportunity.  If you receive peace and the pieces fall into place, say yes.  If you don’t, bow out gracefully.  You may disappoint others, but I can guarantee that you’ll disappoint them more if you show up grumpy and unprepared because you really did need some rest!

What about those who are already in regular ministry?  We’ll take a look at that next week, but for now, feel free to share your own thoughts in the comment box below!

Evangelism and Physical Fitness: Setting Boundaries Between Rest and Work I Enjoy

13 Sep

If you sometimes have difficulty finding the line between work and play, you aren’t alone!  Engaged in a form of employment that allows me to explore my passion and utilize my creativity, it’s sometimes difficult to see where rest ends and work begins.  Unfortunately, this pleasant blur doesn’t change the fact that rest is still essential if I’m going to effectively share God’s love with others.

Unlike the cranky Christian discussed in “Resting One Moment at a Time”, those who love their work run the risk of becoming an obsessed Christian.  Instead of grumping about everything, obsessed Christians often find their ability to relate to others limited by the things which they feel most passionate about.  The result is that they are often incapable of sharing God’s love outside of the very limited circle of people who share those passions.  I probably don’t need to point out that this isn’t the best profile for anyone seeking to follow Christ’s Matthew 28 commission!

To avoid becoming obsessed Christians, we need to learn to rest… and cultivate interests beyond the sphere of our employment (no matter how thrilling that employment may be).  To do this requires effort, so here are a few tips to get you started.

  1. Set aside time to avoid work.  It may be a full day or just a few hours, but applying your brain to something other than what you do for a living or the subject that you’re studying in school is a healthy habit.  A good rule of thumb is to avoid any activity that may even appear to be related to either of these venues.  (If you aren’t sure whether an activity fits, ask a friend or family member.  Their observations are usually spot-on.)  If you’re studying for a degree in horticulture, don’t spend your “rest time” reading books on plants.  If you’re a graphics designer, set the sketch pad aside.  I may be tempting to cheat, but don’t!  You need this time away.
  2. Explore other people’s passions.  You aren’t the only one completely in love with your vocation!  Take some time to find out more about the hobbies and occupations of your friends and family, then participate with them as they indulge their passion.  Even if it’s work for them, it’ll be a break for you!
  3. Try something new.  The world is full of interesting things to do.  Never picked up a brush?  Why not check out a local painting class?  Wonder why martial artists yell when they attack?  Take a  Karate class!  Never read a fantasy novel?  Ask your local librarian to recommend a good one.  There are plenty of things to explore, so use your rest time to do just that!
  4. Cultivate relationships.  Most Americans don’t have many close friends… so why not fill that gap for someone else?  Take a break from the things that consume you to get to know those within your family, church, or community.  A few hours and a cup of coffee may be all it takes to make a new friend.  If all goes well, you’ll both walk away feeling rested!
  5. Deepen your connection with God.  It’s amazing how quickly He can get sidelined in our lives… even though He’s the One who gave us our passion to begin with!  Why not rekindle that connection?  Instead of doing a quick devotional every day, set aside a larger chunk of time for Bible study and/or prayer.  You may be surprised at just how refreshing this time can become… and how odd your day will feel without it!
  6. Finally, surround yourself with people who have your best interests at heart.  More than once, it’s been my family that has intervened to let me know that I need to slow down a bit.  From the outside, they can see the lines between work and rest quite clearly… even when I can’t.  Find yourself some close friends who are willing to keep an eye on you and who are strong enough to tell you when it’s time to quit.

These are, of course, just a few ideas to get you started.  Apply yourself and you’re sure to come up with a few more!

Next week, we’ll be exploring the tension which often exists between our need for rest and the needs of Christian ministry.  Meanwhile, feel free to share how you escape from becoming an “obsessed Christian” in the comment box below!

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