It’s All About Our Choices

27 Jun

As I neared the end of my budgeting exercise, I began to panic. It was clear that I hadn’t been putting enough thought into the practical matters of life (like saving for the day when my ancient truck finally gives up the ghost). But it was also clear that saving for those eventualities left me with far less to spend on the things in life that I enjoyed. How exactly was I supposed to make the most of my free time if I didn’t have a couple hundred dollars to spend on books each month? And what would life be like without Starbucks? It was clear that more than just my budget was going to require a “makeover”.

While I acknowledged my relative wealth with my mouth (and with regular charitable giving), it was clear that the message had yet to reach my heart. I had enough, but I felt like I was impoverished. I had failed to recognize that the wise handling of money (just like everything else in life) is about our choices. Dave may have recommended that I dedicate a certain percentage of my income to retirement… but doing so was a choice that I would have to make. Dave suggested that I consider spending less on food, but the decision was mine. With each dollar I allocated, I was making a choice between living with a sense that money controls me or that I control the money. The former brings a sense of slavery. The latter, an undeniable freedom.

Drawing a deep breath, I looked through my budget again – this time with an eye towards practicality and an intense focus upon the two categories to which my impulse spending was most frequently directed. Truthfully, there was nothing that prevented me from making coffee at home. Doing so would reduce my food expenditures by 50% and I could reduce that spending even more if I really tried. Likewise, I rarely had the time to read all of the books that I purchased. With the skill of a surgeon, I cut my budget to reflect the purchase of a mere two volumes a month. (If I needed more reading material, it was rumored that there was a nifty place in town called a “library” where I could go pick out books and take them home… absolutely free!)

I took Dave’s advice and put together envelopes for both of these impulse categories. With cash in each, I would be able to regulate my spending in ways that were nearly impossible when I used my “charge-it-to-the-credit-card-and-pay-it-off-at-the-end-of-the-month” method. Then, I gave the new method a try at the brand new health food store.

List in hand, budget in mine, I cruised the aisles admiring all of the delightful product offerings. I carefully examined my options for each item on my “needs” list and selected the most financially responsible products. Then, each time I picked up something that wasn’t on my list I asked myself, “Do I want to remove cash from my miscellaneous food envelope to pay for this?” One item after another went back onto the shelf, ear-marked for another day. I left the store having spent a mere pittance compared to the previous month… and each “treat” I purchased tasted twice as sweet!

More importantly, I’d finally gotten around to taking responsibility for the money God had entrusted me with. I was no longer a victim held captive by a low salary, government policies, or societal expectations. Instead, I was a steward who could account for each dollar entrusted to them. I was free.

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