Evangelism and Physical Fitness: Avoiding the Sin of Gluttony Part II

20 Dec

Last week in “Avoiding the Sin of Gluttony”, we discussed importance of moderation in what we eat. We explored the value of monitoring our caloric intake to ensure that our bodies are actually using what we put into them. We also considered how that intake varies for different people at different times in their lives. But is balancing your calories enough to help you steer clear of the sin of gluttony?

If you played along and tracked what you ate this last week, you probably noticed a few patterns in the what, when, and how much you eat. You may have noticed that you have a weakness for doughnuts, coffee, or a really good steak. Perhaps you even noticed that you do demonstrate moderation in what you eat and don’t eat more (in a caloric sense) than you actually need to maintain a healthy body.

If, however, you were tracking the nutritional value of what you ate and not just the calorie count, you likely noticed that there is far more involved in a balanced diet than simply subtracting the calories you expend from the calories you take in. If you’re a bit like me, you eat more sugar than is strictly healthy (at least according to the current views of the American Heart Association) and could use just a bit more protein and fiber.

And this leads us to our second point about gluttony: the concept of moderation applies not just to the overall energy we take in, but also to the way we take in that energy. Does this mean that if we don’t want to be gluttons, we need to avoid doughnuts? Hardly! It doesn’t even mean that we can’t splurge a bit and have two. What it does mean is that we need to ensure that our bodies aren’t getting too much of one thing and too little of others. If maintaining a healthy weight means that we can only take in so many calories each day, but we take in most of those in the forms of sugars or carbs, we end up short-changing ourselves on other things like protein and fiber. Balance and moderation, therefore, require us to pay attention to not just how much we eat, but to what we eat.

Gluttony, however, isn’t just about how much we eat or even what we eat – it’s also about why we eat. Like most sins, dishonoring our bodies through excessive eating or eating the wrong types of things begins not with the head, but with the heart. Next week, we’ll take a look at the role that our thoughts about food play in whether we do or don’t become gluttons. Meanwhile, feel free to share your thoughts on the subject in the comment box below!

 

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